Classic apple pie

by Stephanie Weaver on December 22, 2012

Apple PieSweetly dripping with juice and warm spices, this low-sugar apple pie comes wrapped in a flaky, gluten-free crust. You can serve this to vegans and carnivores alike, no one can ever tell it’s not a standard pie.

In October I had the wonderful opportunity to attend the Produce Marketing Association’s Fresh Summit in Anaheim, CA. One of the Fresh Summit sponsors was Rainier Fruit, who provided these specialty apples to everyone at the opening brunch.Junami applesWhile I did think it was a little odd to put apples in individual boxes, part of the challenge for produce marketers is making their products seem “new.” And that’s where packaging comes in. Junami ApplesThe Junami (pronounced JUNE-ah-mee) is grown in Washington State and has proven to be excellent in storage, so they will begin appearing in grocery stores in the States this month and next. It’s a large, crisp, and exceptionally juicy apple. It did make a delicious pie. Feel free to substitute a tart, firm baking apple like Granny Smiths if you want to make a pie for the holidays or can’t find Junamis. Much of Rainier’s fruit is grown organically (although not all is certified yet), and the Junami will be available as conventionally grown this year (2013) and also organic next year (2014).Whole Apple Pie

Classic apple pie
Serves 8-10

1 lemon
7 small or 4-5 large (800-900 g) Junami or tart baking apples (5-6 C. sliced)
1/4 C. (40 g) granulated maple sugar or organic sugar*
2 T. (16 g) tapioca flour or organic corn starch
1/4 t. (0.5 g) cinnamon
1/4 t. (0.5 g) nutmeg
1/8 t. (pinch) sea salt
1 t. (5 ml) vanilla extract

Double gluten-free pie crust recipe (the how-to video in that post shows you how to roll out the crust)

Preheat the oven to 450F/230C/gas mark 7.

Zest the lemon into a medium-sized bowl and set aside.

Juice the lemon into a large bowl filled with water.

Core each apple using an apple corer, peel them, and thinly slice. Once cut, immediately place the slices into the large bowl of water to keep them from turning brown while you work.

Once the apples are cut, mix the sugar, tapioca flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt together with the lemon zest, stirring until completely mixed. Put the apples in a colander to drain while you start the crust.

Mix and roll out the bottom crust, putting it into your pie dish.

Mix and roll out the top crust. Leave it in the waxed paper for a minute.

Put the drained apples into the bowl with the lemon-zest/flour mixture and add the vanilla. Stir well to coat. Pour the apple mixture into the pie dish. Carefully set the second crust on top, crimping the edges and fixing any cracks as you go.

If you want to add decorative shapes like these, re-roll the crust scraps, cut out and place across the top of the pie, pressing in gently so they stick. Cut a few slits in the top crust so the steam can vent and the filling doesn’t boil over.

Put a baking sheet on the rack below the pie, just in case it does boil over, and put the pie in the oven on the middle rack.

Bake for 10 minutes, then reduce the heat to 350F/180C/gas mark 4. Bake for 25 minutes, or until the crust is golden brown and you see some bubbling of the filling.

Notes: Diabetics can use granulated coconut sugar, which is low-glycemic, or skip the sugar (just start with sweeter apples, not Granny Smiths). As this crust contains bean flour, it provides more fiber and protein than standard white flour, so this dessert should be suitable for diabetics.

Required FTC disclosure: The pie dish and leaf-shaped cookie cutters were sent to me by American Heritage Chocolate. The apples were provided by Rainier Fruit. The Idaho Potato Commission provided my pass to the Fresh Summit. I was not paid to write this post.

All of our recipes are gluten-free, sugar-free, and made with plant-based ingredients to help you build a healthy life. We support Meatless Monday. Look for midweek essays and Friday how-to and giveaways (when available).

So glad I finally bought an apple corer! Makes working with apples a breeze. I also love the OXO peeler.

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